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HOW TO GET THE BEST FROM YOUR REPORTING SERVICE

 

 

Courtesy of Caption Reporters Inc.
A company of their "Word"

 

 

Here are some tips on how to work with the reporter to get the very best record possible:

(1 Provide a spelling list of proper names, organizational acronyms, program materials, handouts, the current agenda, and a seating chart to the reporter as much in advance as possible.  On technical cases, provide us with a glossary of terms.

(2)  Provide a spelling list of proper names, organizational acronyms, program materials, handouts, the current agenda, and a seating chart to the reporter as much in advance as possible.  On technical cases, provide us with a glossary of terms.

(3)  Provide the reporting service with a contact person at the site of the event/proceedings.

(4)  Provide microphones for all speakers, and be emphatic about having all speakers talk into the microphone, including participants from the audience who may have questions or comments.

(5)  Have an awareness of the record.  Remember, the reporter can only mirror what was said... not what was intended.

(6)  One at a time.  There are very few occasions when overlapping speech serves the interests of memorializing a proceeding for future reference, dissemination, or other uses.

(7)  Proper words and names should be pronounced slowly and clearly. When giving spellings or saying acronyms, take extra care "B" often sounds like "D," "M" often sounds like "N," "S" often sounds like "F," and so on.

(8)  Identify numbers clearly.  If you say "one-twenty," is it $120, 1:20 PM, or January 20th?

(9)  Let the reporter know in advance if you have a large number of exhibits she can get a head start on marking the exhibit labels.  Present them in an orderly fashion, identify them, and give the reporter enough time to mark them.

(10)  For members, gathering the gist of what is said during the proceeding may suffice, but the reporter must capture all of the words.  This process takes a fraction of a second longer than understanding the thought, especially if the speaker has an accent.  Also, avoid crowding the remarks with your next question or comment.

(11)  When quoting, give the proper reference, and begin and end by saying "quote" and "unquote."

(12)  If you tell the reporter to go off the record, remember that she will not start writing again until you tell her to go back on the record.

(13)  SPEED KILLS.  In an average day, the court reporter will write anywhere from 30,000 to 50,000 words.  It is best for everyone that this not occur in the first two hours!  Keep the deposition flowing in a smooth, conversational pace, speaking one at a time, loudly and clearly.  Reporting at an intense and hectic pace, especially over an extended period of time, can compromise the reporter's accuracy and endurance.

 

 
     
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